Walden: Life in the Woods

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“Walden House”  |  Anthony Satori

“My dwelling was small, and I could hardly entertain an echo in it; but it seemed larger for being a single apartment and remote from neighbors.”

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“Walden House II (Interior)”  |  Anthony Satori

“All the attractions of a house were concentrated in one room; it was kitchen, chamber, parlor, and keeping-room; and whatever satisfaction [one may] derive from living in a house, I enjoyed it all.”

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“Walden House III”  |  Anthony Satori

“The snow had already covered the ground… and surrounded me suddenly with the scenery of winter.  I withdrew yet farther into my shell, and endeavored to keep a bright fire both within my house and within my breast.”

— Henry David Thoreau  (Walden: Life in the Woods, 1854)

I Do Not Know Its Name

BlogImage - SatoriCircleDotCom - February 9 2019

“Golden”  |  Anthony Satori

“There was something undifferentiated and yet complete, which existed before Heaven and Earth.  Soundless and formless, it depends on nothing and does not change.  It may be considered the mother of the universe.  I do not know its name;  I call it Tao.”

— Lao Tzu

This week was the start of the Lunar New Year.  Kung xi fa cai, everyone! (A wish for happiness and prosperity.)  Cheers!

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Hot Sauce

BlogImage - SatoriCircleDotCom - May 26 2018

“Hot Sauce”  |  Anthony Satori

There is a wall at our local fish house which displays various brands of hot sauce from around the world.  It features sauces of many different flavors, styles, origins, and intensities.  When I look at it, it makes me think of how the sharing of food and flavors from different regions and countries has a way of making the world a smaller place, bringing otherwise disparate people closer together, causing us to feel more connected to one another’s cultures and traditions. 

If you want to understand someone better, share a meal with them.  If you want to understand a place better, take the time to seek out and experience some of the local cuisine.  If you want to feel closer to a specific person, cook something that is meaningful to you and enjoy it with them, and then let them do the same for you.  Food can be so much more than just nutrition, so much more than just “filling up.”  Food can play a very real role in both intercultural understanding and interpersonal relations, because it touches at the very heart of the human experience.

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